Closure and Time Frames: Korie Cedre

For our fourth blog post, I found a graphic novel to check out from the Owen Science Library. The graphic novel I decided upon was one in which I recognized the title, intriguing me as it was something I was familiar with already. Below are scans from the graphic novel, “The Imitation Game, Alan Turing Decoded,” by Jim Ottaviani and illustrated by Leland Purvis. After skimming it in the library, I noticed that it appealed to me by using a variety of bright and pastel colors, and how the comic seemed to be hand-drawn with a pen. The story revolves around Turing, an extremely bright man and the difficulties that come with it.

Following this, the first example of closure I recognized was towards the middle of the graphic novel. As one can see on the left hand side of the graphic novel, page 140, there are a total of 6 frames, the middle frame being the longer one. Previous to this specific frame, the readers can see, and read linguistically, that Turing is working on a contraption that requires sound waves and electricity. The second frame shows him up close with a concerned look as he takes tools to the lightbulbs. The frame right after is Turing, in the same scene, jumping back as there is a flash in which readers can assume that he was zapped while working with the lightbulbs. This becomes an action-to-action example of closure as readers can see Turing make transitions in the frames due to his actions, and as well transitions in a single subject/scene. This becomes a distinct series of actions, becoming an action-to-action scene as Turing is working on a contraption involving electricity, thus shocking himself.

“The Imitation Game,” a graphic novel by Jim Ottaviani and illustrated by Leland Purvis, about the life of Alan Turing (Ottaviani and Purvis, The Imitation Game, Abrams Comic Arts, 2016, pgs 140-141).

Another example asked to find was a scene in which the reader needs to be engaged; needs to participate or interpret the scene specifically. A scene I found that requires the reader to read the images closely is on page 220 and 221; the end of the graphic novel. As one can see, the two pages only show two frames, an apple that was cut in half, and another apple that is also cut in half, but aged. The reason I chose this scene is because in the pages beforehand, we see Turing cutting an apple to eat before falling asleep. However, these frames, pictured below, come right after in which it is left for the reader to interpret what happens afterwards. One can question if these two differently aged apples are even the same apple, and if they are, how long has time passed? The reader can also interpret if the apple represents the passing of Turing, or if it was simply forgotten about. Similar to the scene mentioned in McCloud’s graphic novel, the readers are the actual killers. As readers, we do not officially see Turing die, but assume by the aging of this apple that he has and remains in bed, deceased. In a sense, the readers are who kill Turing officially just by acknowledging the suggested meaning of the aged apple. In no way does the graphic novel state he is dead linguistically, thus, being time frames that ask for serious viewer participation.

“The Imitation Game,” a graphic novel by Jim Ottaviani and illustrated by Leland Purvis, about the life of Alan Turing (Ottaviani and Purvis, The Imitation Game, Abrams Comic Arts, 2016, pgs 220-221).

This entry was posted in 201 Blog, Closure & Time Frames. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s