Closure and Time Frames: Ivy Padayao

The graphic novel I chose for this blog is Urgent Request by Gene Luen Yang and Derek Kirk Kim. It is loosely about a woman named Janet who receives an email from a said Nigerian prince who needs her bank account information, and soon she falls in love with this prince over email.

Graphic novel Urgent Request by Gene Luen Yang and Derek Kirk Kim page 113 (closure)

One example of closure that really stuck out to me over and over again within this story was action-to-action. Within the book, there is a lot of examples of the girl completing various actions throughout the panels. This leaves it up to the reader to determine how she completed these actions and how much time it took up. Thus, letting the reader create the closure with the various gaps between the actions. In this example on page 113, you can see there is what looks like a storm, then her walking into a hallway with an umbrella that’s wet, her reading a note on the door, and her continuing to open the door. These are all separate actions carried out in different panels on the page. The author is meaning to leave the reader to create closure and to infer what is going on in the story.

As for the author creating time frames, each page within this story has a lot of “blank

Graphic novel Urgent Request by Gene Luen Yang and Derek Kirk Kim page 115 (time frames)

space” around the graphic panels; this seems to create a tone with the reader to infer that there is a lot of time passing between each action of the panels. In this example on page 115, you can see a panel of Janet sleeping on the ground in her hallway and a lot of blank space, then another panel of the outside of her workspace; letting the reader infer that a lot of time had passed between her sleeping and then going to work the next day. 

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