WSU Art Museum: Isabella Troiani

One of the most unique collections we saw during our visit to WSU was the artwork created by a nun named Corina Kempt. While the museum director himself was not fond of the pieces, I thought they were great examples of typography. She is famous for creating a LOVE stamp in the 1980s and her unique use of screen painting. She worked with a lot of words and vivid colors. I was struck by the thought that her designs were so simple, they

Corina Kent, unnamed. Depicts materials-based method. Paint on paper. 

almost looked like they were created by a child. Along with the simplistic artwork, every piece was complete with a quote, usually about love, that she imagined herself. Her work didn’t seem amazingly religious to me but more about peace and acceptance. The piece I chose to write about was unnamed but depicts a butterfly with rainbow wings and a scribbled purple quote that reads “there is no birth  of consciousness without pain.” The butterfly has obvious paint strokes, with different weights and densities. The colors are vivid and simple. All in all, the image resembles a child’s finger painting. The script is nearly illegible (I still do not know what the last words says), with fast-paced lettering and uneven density. It looks obviously very methods-based, seemingly done with the same paint from which she made the butterfly. I thought the script of this piece would be similar to mine, in the way that I also want my typography to seem materials-based and quick. A lot of the elements – the cursive inspiration, the unevenness, the messiness – are what I want to come across in my typography inspired by Sylvia Plath. While Sylvia Plath’s writing is somewhat more structured and legible than Kent’s, I want the typography to be more messy, like Kent’s. The “f” and “t” were very similar from both examples. Kent’s piece gave me inspiration to edit the neat script more.

About isabellatroiani

A 20 year-old student who loves all things food, art, and travel.
This entry was posted in 336 Spring 2018, wsu art museum. Bookmark the permalink.

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