Closure and Time Frames: Ben Apostol

The graphic novel that I have been taking a look at is one of Scott McClouds Superman adventure books “A Big Problem”. Scott McCloud had released many Superman graphic novels that are similar in design and have the same comic style. One example of closure in one of the pages that I found was a scene created towards the beginning of the book that is the first unstructured or not uniformly framed. It shows a whole scene but still has one frame in the picture to show that something else important is happening outside of the large scene that is being shown more dominantly. Even the letters which are supposed to show sounds that are being created throughout the scene are shown to be taking up their own space on the page, giving the reader the option on when to acknowledge the different moving parts within this big scene. There is a lot of moving parts to this scene when broken down and looked at more closely, and leaves a lot of interpretation up to the reader on how they want to analyze all that is happening.

The scene that I chose to use for demonstrating how time frames are shown in graphic novels such as Scott McClouds, I chose a scene that was lighter on structure, yet still presents a lot of elements for the reader to discover at their own pace of reading and understanding. The particular page that I chose does not necessarily have an order to it which is why I thought that it fit pretty well for highlighting time frames. Time frames suggest that there is a time line that the author of the graphic novel wanted to convey, or let the reader convey for themselves. For the page that I chose, the timing of events on the page for the scene are up to the reader. Because there is so much going on at once, the author wanted the reader to take their time and look at the different elements that are making up the scene and determine your own timeline.


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