Individual Voices: Isaiah Wilkerson

For this blog prompt, we visited the art museum and looked at many different examples of comics portraying their individual point of views and their different unique strategies of having their voices be heard. I found the art museum to be similar to the MASC but more delicate and organized. I believe my art musem experience was different from my MASC experience because I had more time to observe the artists comics and I believe the examples given were more personal and ground breaking than the historic/popular comics in the MASC.

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WSU’s Art Museum Collection Study Center of David Lasky’s “Cartoonists Sur. L’Herbe, picture by: Isaiah Wilkerson, 10/21/19

With that being said, I really could relate to David Lasky’s “Cartoonists Sur. L’Herbe”. The concept of this art is showing many different cartoonists versions of characters who are depicted as flawed or imperfect to relate to their audiences to let them know that they’re not alone, stating that, “I was taking in as much as I could and I just got a sense of people expressing their own dysfunctions for the reader, saying, ‘You’re not alone’” (qtd in WSU’s Art Museum Collection Study Center Northwest Alternative Comics exhibition 2016).I liked this concept because I really like visual art, or any type of art, that has a message beind the art that speaks to the viewer/listener. The art shows many different cartoonists doing different activities at the same time. Each cartoonist has a speech bubble by them that have a their most famous fictional character insider each bubble that makes this art so special. This is an example of interdependent because without the speech bubbles, you most likely couldn’t depict the significance of the cartoonist, same vise versa with their art. I could relate to this as an artist because I did something very similar to this in my 2D art & design class.

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