Invisible Emotion: Arron Borja

The comic that I chose from the MASC visit today that demonstrates line quality and how it conveys emotion is the 3D Batman comic. I chose this comic because the way that the lines are behind each other to make the figures three-dimensional is very interesting. Also, from McCloud, he stated that all lines hold “expressive potential” and I feel that the lines in this comic really do portray expressive potential. I have chosen the left page in this picture because the dragon in the biggest frame really pops out thanks to the effective use in line behind it and throughout its body. The rugged lines and shapes throughout the dragon’s body suggest anger/hostility and a rugged/scaly feel to its body. I think that this comic is a great example of how line quality conveys emotion in comics.

 

Cecil C. Addle’s poster comics are a great example of an interdependent word/picture combo. This comic uses mainly the characters in each scene with very little background or location detail. I feel that this is because the author wanted the viewer to strictly focus on the words and pictures depicted in the frames. This seems like a very traditional way of making comics, but I just feel that this poster comic in particular is a great example because of how the author made it so that the viewer had to mentally picture the environment with the information given from the words and drawings. To conclude, I think that this comic is duo-specific because of the equal-seeming amount of effort from both words and drawings. Regardless of the effort balance however, I feel like it is as long as the message/story was projected effectively, this comic will still have been successful. Also in this comic, the author modified the spelling of certain words and it seems like this was for kids to relate because some of the words are spelt in the way that kids pronounce them.

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