Closure and Time Frames: Bailey Tompkins

The graphic novel that I have chosen for this blog is called Displacement a travelogue, by Lucy Knisley. This novel is about a granddaughter who leaves New York to go on a cruise to the Caribbean to accompany her elderly grandparents.

Displacement a Travelogue, by Lucy Knisley, Page 119

Within the comic, there are many different types of closure. One example that stood out to me as a very common occurrence in this book particularly is an example of action-to-action closure. The example in the figure displayed on page 119, portrays a girl talking to her grandmother about making and appointment to go to the spa, and then she walks to the phone to call and book an appointment, and then she calls the spa but she also picks up a bill on the table that she didn’t know was there. This is an example of action-to-action because this scene displays the girls action from talking to her grandmother in the kitchen where she is taking her medications, to then being in a different room where she is calling the spa, to then being on the phone with the spa. These events are not happening at the same time, but rather in sequential order and in different sceneries of the house. As McCloud describes action-to-action closure on page 70, it is the “transitions featuring a single subject in distinct action-to-action progressions”.

Displacement a Travelogue, by Lucy Knisley, Page 118

The majority of this novel utilizes text bubbles as a easy to follow time frames for the reader, however there are a few instances where the author allowed participation and interpretation to be influenced by the readers discretion. On page 118, the text does not read simply left to right or have a clear order of top to bottom. The layout could be read in many different patterns which could potentially change the way the reader perceives the message if read in a different order.

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