Formstorming: Aache’ Howard-McDaniel

     Formstorming is the process of visually thinking, creators use this as a tool to put more depth into their designs when they are too basic. Through automatic, easily conceived notions, towards recognizable but subtle concepts, to results that showcase the creator’s originality. The quilt I chose to look at for this blog post demonstrates the process of formstorming.  In the description of the quilt titled “Blocks, Strips, Strings, And Half Squares” made by Mary Lee Bendolph, it explains how she was inspired by a “fine art” intaglio print she made herself during the two weeks she spent in Berkeley, California in the summer of 2005. She would take the prints she has already created and adapted one medium to another. Bendolph would take her original paintings and use other aesthetics she was introduced to while traveling or being introduced to other artwork to deepen her work.

     

“Blocks, Strips, Strings, And Half Squares” by Mary Lee Bendolph
2005, Cotton, 84 x 81 inches

In art balance allows our eyes to look at the piece as a whole, rather than being drawn to one particular aspect of a piece. While rhythm is a strong, simply repeated pattern. Bendolph’s created produces both balance and rhythm. The quilt is aesthetically pleasing due to her ability to balance everything out. Although there is contrast in the piece, the red color is equally placed within the quilt, balancing it out with the black and white color. Even though the red is bright and has the power to draw the eyes in, it does not. The rhythm in her piece shows through the repeated bold patterns she created, “Blacks, Strips, Strings, and Half Squares. In this piece, there are both geometric and organic shapes, since she used squares and make a new shape out of the squares. The pattern in the quilt is abstract, and it does not represent anything. It is simply just repeated geometric/organic shapes.

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