Pattern and Texture: Alex Hagen

This is a photo of colored hexagons with a CC0 Public Domain license from Public Domain Pictures

Pattern: a pattern is a recurring design formed from points, lines, or planes that form a graphic or image. It can be a subtle design or enhance the overall power of the image with bright colors or textures. In order to demonstrate pattern, I decided to use this photo of a hexagon wallpaper. Points and lines come together to create a cohesive shape (hexagon), which when duplicated many times forms this pattern. When color is added, a beautiful pattern can be replicated to form seamless images such as this one.

This is a rope photo taken from Pixabay

 

Texture:  the tactile grain of surfaces and substances in both the physical and virtual world. In images, texture is often made up of planes and depths, which can be viewed by the observer as an ocular 3D representation despite being viewed in a 2D medium. Texture can often give an indication of traits of the object in question; hardness, sharpness, softness, and more. For my image, I used this photo of a rope texture. Users who look at this picture can tell without a doubt that the ropes have a coarse rope texture, despite not being able to physically feel the rope between their fingers. Despite being viewed in a 2D medium, people can see that depth is created by texture in this image.

This is an image of rock mandala art taken from deMilked.com

Lastly, I found this image of mandala art painted on rocks to illustrate a combination of all these factors. The image is composed of bright patterns of color, replicated over and over while changing size and color. Points of bright color spiral down into a focal point in the center, creating these beautiful mandala shapes. The texture of the rock gives the photo a semblance of depth, further accentuating the effects given by the spiraling color patterns. Both texture and pattern are combined in this image to give a stunning mandala effect.

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