Point, Line, Plane, and Balance

FSG_neruda3

Elena Giavaldi is a book cover designer and illustrator based out of Brooklyn, New York. Giavaldi designed a book cover for the novel All the Odes by Pablo Neruda in 2012. This particular version of the cover was not selected for the final cover; however, ultimately one of her designs was chosen.

Visit Elena Giavaldi’s Website.

Visually, when I first looked at this book cover, my eyes were first drawn to all of the lines that extend from the corners and edges of the larger font size letters. These edges and corners create lines vertically, diagonally, and horizontally without being overly distracting. It was still clear to me the order in which I should read the words. I also think that these lines create different planes of text within the book cover with the first plane of text being in the upper-right section of the cover and the second being the lower-right section. When I look at the cover I see two distinguishable planes that seem to extend off the edge of the page because of the lines. Without these lines, the cover would have felt out of balance, with too much blank space existing. A third and much smaller plane is created using the smaller text on the left side of the cover, the small text signify points within a plane of blank space created by the lines extending from the larger text, which act almost like borders. The placement of the points created by text also help balance out the cover and help fill the blank space.

While, the cover does seem somewhat balanced, it is asymmetrical in design with more blank space on the left side of the cover than the right. Because the right side of the cover is so busy, if the design attempted to be symmetrical by filling more blank space on the left side, the cover would become cluttered. The lines create contrasting elements that extend beyond the points of text that create the planes and force me to move my eyes in all different directions, which creates a sense of balance rather than having my eyes focus on one small section of the cover.

In this case, scale was used to emphasize the importance of some text over others. Even though, traditionally people read left to right, my eyes were instantly drawn to the title and the author’s name because of the size of text in relation to the smaller text on the let that notes that it is a bilingual edition and who the editor is. And, while the information in the smaller text is important it is not necessarily what will draw readers in. Overall, the diverse use of typography and font size to create lines, points, and planes creates a visually dynamic book cover without being overly cluttered or confusing.

Visually, when I first looked at this book cover, my eyes were first drawn to all of the lines that extend from the corners and edges of the larger font size letters. These edges and corners create lines vertically, diagonally, and horizontally without being overly distracting. It was still clear to me the order in which I should read the words. I also think that these lines create different planes of text within the book cover with the first plane of text being in the upper-right section of the cover and the second being the lower-right section. When I look at the cover I see two distinguishable planes that seem to extend off the edge of the page because of the lines. Without these lines, the cover would have felt out of balance, with too much blank space existing. A third and much smaller plane is created using the smaller text on the left side of the cover, the small text signify points within a plane of blank space created by the lines extending from the larger text, which act almost like borders. The placement of the points created by text also help balance out the cover and help fill the blank space.

While, the cover does seem somewhat balanced, it is asymmetrical in design with more blank space on the left side of the cover than the right. Because the right side of the cover is so busy, if the design attempted to be symmetrical by filling more blank space on the left side, the cover would become cluttered. The lines create contrasting elements that extend beyond the points of text that create the planes and force me to move my eyes in all different directions, which creates a sense of balance rather than having my eyes focus on one small section of the cover.

In this case, scale was used to emphasize the importance of some text over others. Even though, traditionally people read left to right, my eyes were instantly drawn to the title and the author’s name because of the size of text in relation to the smaller text on the let that notes that it is a bilingual edition and who the editor is. And, while the information in the smaller text is important it is not necessarily what will draw readers in. Overall, the diverse use of typography and font size to create lines, points, and planes creates a visually dynamic book cover without being overly cluttered or confusing.

 

This entry was posted in Sample Posts by Students, Spring 2016 Archive (336). Bookmark the permalink.

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