Closure and Time Frames: Shira Feinberg

After careful consideration as to which graphic novel I will read for this class, I ended up choosing “Maus 2”. Throughout my k-12 education, I learned about the Holocaust and got the chance to read “Maus 1”. This sparked my interest t want to continue to read the series, however I prefer reading non-fiction novels over any sort of graphic novel. With that said, “Maus 2” is a non-fiction graphic novel and I want to learn more about what happened to the author’s father, in the sequel.

An example of aspect to aspect from Chapter One, page 14 of Art Spiegelman’s graphic novel Maus 2: A Survivor’s Tale and Here My Troubles Began.

Art Spiegelman, the author of “Maus 2: A Survivor’s Tale and Here My Troubles Began,” uses several closure methods throughout the novel. An example of this closure is aspect to aspect which is seen when we see the mice driving away and, in the car, (Art Spiegelman, page 14).

An example of subject to subject from Chapter One, page 24 of Art Spiegelman’s graphic novel Maus 2: A Survivor’s Tale and Here My Troubles Began.

Another example of closure that is seen in “Maus 2” is subject to subject when the main character asks his father what happened when they arrived to be separated and the father has a flashback to when the cat (Nazi) told them what to do (Art Spiegelman, page 24).

An example of scene to scene from Chapter One, page 36 of Art Spiegelman’s graphic novel Maus 2: A Survivor’s Tale and Here My Troubles Began.

Furthermore, the author uses scene to scene to go back and forth between Art’s conversation with his father and his father’s story telling of what has happened to him during his time in the concentration camp (Art Spiegelman, page 36).

An example of time frames from Chapter One, page 25 of Art Spiegelman’s graphic novel Maus 2: A Survivor’s Tale and Here My Troubles Began.

Art Spiegelman doesn’t just use closure methods to inform the reader of what is happening. He also uses time frame complexities to have the reader question the meaning of time and how Art’s father sees what has happened to him as something that he is reliving by speaking about it (Art Spiegelman, page 25). This is seen when Art and his father talk and the reader doesn’t read from left to right and down, but rather left then down then right and down.

Overall, Art Spiegelman uses several techniques to further emphasis the information he is trying to convey. Above are just a few examples of different techniques that he uses, but Spiegelman uses so many more techniques. Another thing to note, is that some of my examples may be interpreted into several closure types.

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