Point, Line, Plane – Sample Post by Kristin Becker

This poster showcases the typeface Officina, which was designed by German designer Erik Spiekermann in 1990. (de Jong, Creative Type, p.274)

This poster showcases the typeface Officina, which was designed by German designer Erik Spiekermann in 1990. (de Jong, Creative Type, p.274)

I feel this poster is balanced because my eye moves through the composition without getting stuck: The bold title of the poster at mid-line (ITC Officiana) functions as both a point and a line. It functions as a point because it is the focal point of the poster: This is where my eye looks first. It is also a line because it sits above and below the black/white division of the poster, separating the information at the top of the poster (white background) and the information at the bottom of the poster (black background). Note: This is also an example of a figure-ground reversal. The small block of text in italics directly above the “ITC Officina” text also functions as a point because it draws the eye and is surrounded by so much white space (negative space). The columns of text to the right and left that illustrate the different weights and styles available in this font read as lines, pointing the eye back down to the black section at the bottom. The blocks of text in this section (white text is now positive and black becomes negative) read as separate shapes, but also begin to group together and read as a plane, radiating outward. The ragged edges on the right sides of these columns also push my eye to the right as I look at the poster, pushing my eye back up into the white space of the top. The poster feels visually stable because of the overall symmetrical balance created by the equally-sized black and white sections and the central placement of the “ITC Officina” title, which has a larger scale and therefore seems the most important. The design is also active and dynamic, though, because the black section feels heavier than the white section, which makes the composition feel grounded, with asymmetrical balance achieved through contrast of dark and light values.

This entry was posted in Point, Line, Plane, Sample Posts by Your Professor, Spring 2017 Archive (336). Bookmark the permalink.

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