Type Anatomy: Daniel Kim

Image from the book Printing of Today: An Illustrated Survey of Post-war Typography in Europe and the United States by Oliver Simon.

The typography inside this image of a book cover is very clean and has a classy feel to it. The serifs on the typography is sharp and geometric and this is what creates this clean and classy mood. I believe the creator of this book cover used this form of typography to help fabricate a sense of ethos for the author of the book and book cover. Due to all of the typography being uppercase there is a lack of ascenders and descenders, but this helps create a sharper look because all of the typography are the same in height in their respective areas. If there were ascenders and descenders, it would take away from the clean look because the extra length going below or above the cap height of the uppercase letters. Also, lowercase letters x-height would make the book cover look more “ridged” due to the varying heights. The spine of the “S” in this typography is fairly thicker than the rest of the “S” and get’s thicker as it reaches either ends of the letter.

This typography being used the book title, also doesn’t have a ligature, making it look more uniform and less clustered. The space in between each letter takes away from clutter and does a good job at filling up the right amount of dead-space. The giant “O” in the center of the book cover seems to be made larger to help the balance of the piece. The color choice of the typography holds a high contrast from the orange image, inside the “O”, and the two orange lines below the title. The helps the fonts feel more heavy and solid, if they used a lighter color for the typography the mood given off would have been more light and friendly. This typography is definitely a Material-based example because one can notice there are not breaks in each individual letters. Also, this style of text is very uniformed and easy to read.

This entry was posted in 336 Spring 2018, type anatomy. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s