Pattern and Texture: Isabella Troiani

A photo of the Altare della Patria in Rome, Italy. Taken by me in summer 2017.

Pattern and texture are often intertwined in graphic design. Pattern can be described simply as a repetitive design. The variations (of color, size, spacing, and so on) incite different emotions and uses.

The following photo is a good depiction of this term. It is a photo of the ceiling of an Italian national monument. The pattern is clearly visible – an intricate design of octagons, diamonds, flowers, and embossing, each repeated so precisely. They have the same amount of space between them and are all the same size as their counterparts.

A photo from shantanukashyap, 2017. Depicts the texture of a carpet. https://pixabay.com/en/texture-fabric-gray-pattern-2630309/

In comparison, texture can be defined as the feel of an item/image. This means the actual physical feeling of a piece upon touching it, or how it seems it would feel. The photo to the left gives a sense of texture. Although we can not feel it physically, we can see the coarseness of each strand and we can imagine the way the braided pieces would feel. The photo gives off a sense of touch, almost a three-dimensional feel.

 

 

Building in neighborhood of Naples, Italy. Photo taken by me in summer 2017.

Pattern and texture can be intertwined with the idea of planes, points, and lines, as seen in the Graphic Design: The New Basics. 

Another architectural photo illustrates this notion. This building caught my attention in a sea of ancient apartment buildings. Each wall on the checkered building represents a plane. Within this plane, the wall is separated by lines. Each enclosed lines creates a brick, or plane. The lines and planes show distance – the further away the wall gets, the smaller the bricks get. While this building displays planes, lines, and points, it also also defines pattern. The brick colors are interchanged repetitively on each row, creating a checkered pattern. The placement of each brick is chosen explicitly – no one black brick is directly lined up with the black brick below.

About isabellatroiani

A 20 year-old student who loves all things food, art, and travel.
This entry was posted in 336 Spring 2018, pattern, texture. Bookmark the permalink.

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