Framing: Alexandra Borders

 

lynda-barry-book

Page 23 from Lynda Barry’s “Picture This.” Barry, Lynda, and Kevin Kawula. Picture This. Montréal, Quebec: Drawn & Quarterly, 2010. Print.

 

Framing is important in art pieces, but even further, it is an important component of life. Frames works to help our understanding and perception of specific content, essentially being found everywhere and in different aspects of life.

This is a page taken from Lynda Barry’s Picture This. Her style is interesting, and I think this page acts as a prime example of framing, seeing as the picture is essentially made up of various frameworks. Though cropped, it can still be seen that there is a blue margin around the picture, the blue atoning to the theme of the page, blending with more than separating the picture. This frame works more cohesively with the picture.

In two places there are sections where text and swatches of blue are put against a white background, these places are framed to set them apart from the larger blue background, and actually work to demand attention to the different shades of blue. The framing of the text in this picture is set off from the images, instead of overlapping or obstructing them. This helps pull focus to the picture as a whole, which seems collage-like and might explain why Barry’s framing is prevalent in this piece.

With the other framing, Barry also has a picture zoomed in on a character, which looks as if it has been cropped from a larger picture, presumably one of the girl sitting in a theatre. This works to scale the picture, making it seem bigger than it might have before. Another part of Barry’s framing on this page is her use of borders in a darker blue around the picture and sections (or on the edge of the inside of the smaller pictures). Even though these simple borders are indeed blue, they are dark enough to separate the parts of the page and offer another way of calling attention to the piece as a whole.

This entry was posted in Sample Posts by Students, Spring 2017 Archive (336). Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s