Pattern Design: Maryssa Beare

Album cover designer, Brandon Rike, gives a face to the character Blurryface by combining the elements of Twenty One Pilots as a band, but also what the album brings (Brandon RIke, web, http://brandonrike.com/behind-blurryface

Album cover designer, Brandon Rike, gives a face to the character Blurryface by combining the elements of Twenty One Pilots as a band, but also what the album brings (Brandon Rike, web)

While there is indeed geometry in this cover design, Blurryface focuses more on being organic, showing the geometry in the natural world, structure in the natural world. Designer Brandon Rike uses the dot method in his design, having some organic stripes (tree branches, lightning strikes, coral patterns) and organic dots (birds) but also a geometric/organic shape (shattered ice) occupying the negative spaces of the foreground dots. The foreground dots are arranged in a grid manner, 3×3, which brings brings a manner of emphasis on the dots by way of value; having the dots surrounded by black, it already brings focus to the dots, but two of the dots are red, making viewers take closer looks at those dots, and then the others.

Steve Attardo designs a heavily geometric book cover for Henry Miller, encompassing the literal and metaphorical enigmas that are found in the book (Steve Attardo, web).

Steve Attardo designs a heavily geometric book cover for Henry Miller, encompassing the literal and metaphorical enigmas that are found in the book (Steve Attardo, web).

This pattern is far more geometric, helped further by the lack of curves, but moreover, a rigid balance in the pattern as a whole. The symmetry in it all is also specifically geometric, not giving room to minute flaws that organic symmetry has. Because mazes are well-known patterns/entities, we see a grid-like line structure here and accept it as thus, not really perturbed by whether it’s a line or grid or not. Since white is commonly perceived in negative space, this design has an interesting play on the eye since the lines of a maze are always seen as the positive space.

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